Irina Anatolievna

Web Designer

Web Developer

Freelancer

Photographer

Irina Anatolievna

Web Designer

Web Developer

Freelancer

Photographer

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Psychology of color and web design. Short.

Tuesday October 29th, 2019 web design
Psychology of color and web design. Short.

Colors and emotions are inextricably linked and designers are just beginning to understand and take advantage of them, which makes sense when you consider that color in design (especially in newspapers and magazines) has really become widespread only in the last half century or so.And yet, the psychological impact of color on user behavior is significant. A simple change such as changing the color of a button can increase the desired behavior in a double or even three-digit percentage. Overlooking this vital component of user experience design is a huge mistake that is easy to avoid with a little training and research.

What is color psychology?

Little rigorous research has been conducted on the psychological effects of color. However, color psychology is an important area of branding and other design disciplines. Most studies on the effects of color have been done for practical reasons and mainly consist of individual examples and case studies from individual companies and designers.Ask the designers, however, whether they take into account the psychological influence of color on human behavior, and the vast majority of them will confirm that they do it. Skipping color psychology is a quick way to provide a bad user experience and lower the conversion rate of a website or application.

Why color affects emotions

Why do colors affect how people feel?There are a number of elements that can affect how a person feels when exposed to a particular color. One of the important factors is personal connection with color. If, for example, a favorite toy in childhood was blue, then he may have a preference for blue throughout life. Or, at the opposite end of the spectrum, if a blue car hit them in childhood, they might have a strong negative emotional reaction to the blue color.However, due to universal human experience, it can be predicted how most people will react to a particular color. For example, green is often associated with nature and growth, because most people have witnessed plant growth.

Blue is almost universally soothing because it is associated with things like sky and water.Purple is still associated with luxury because purple was prohibitively expensive and rare in many ancient cultures, and was therefore used only by the royal family. In fact, this is not a natural association, but it was an important enough part of the cultural spirit of the time long enough to become part of the human psyche.